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Full Anthony Saunders Print List

Naval and Aviation Art of Anthony Saunders

Anthony Saunders must be one of the most outstanding naval and aviation artists around today. He has extraordinary skill in portraying scenes of aerial combat that took place before he was born. Although in his own words Anthony prefers the artistic side of painting war aircraft rather than the historic side, he will spend many hours researching a subject, making sure that it is technically correct in every detail before applying any oil to canvas. The results of this technical and artistic skill are easy to see in his paintings; breathtaking skyscapes graced with the machines of aerial warfare beautifully brought to life with the rich colour that is unique to oil paint. With this skill it is hardly surprising that Anthony also paints many subjects other than aviation; scenes from Crimea and Waterloo are a particular favourite. He is equally at home with landscapes and portraits.



NEW - Naval Art Postcards

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New Print Packs
Dambusters 70th Anniversary Double Remarques by Anthony Saunders.

Final Briefing by Anthony Saunders. (RMB)

The Breach by Anthony Saunders. (RMB)
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Malta Spitfires Aviation Prints by Stan Stokes and Anthony Saunders.

Stung by the Wasp by Stan Stokes. (C)

Maltese Falcons by Anthony Saunders. (C)
Save £115!
Battle for Italy Portfolio Remarques by Anthony Saunders.

Roam at Will by Anthony Saunders. (RM)

Battle of the Brenner by Anthony Saunders. (RM)
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Mosquito Aircraft Art Print Pack by Graeme Lothian and Anthony Saunders.

Mosquito Attack by Graeme Lothian.

Return From Leipzig by Anthony Saunders. (C)
Save £110!
USAAF Aircraft Prints by Anthony Saunders.

Guardian Angel by Anthony Saunders.

Berlin Bound by Anthony Saunders.
Save £40!


The Luftwaffe had done everything in its power to pummel London into submission but they failed. By the end of September 1940 their losses were mounting. For weeks since the early days of September, London had been the main target for the Luftwaffe and during that time Luftwaffe High Command had grown increasingly despondent as their losses steadily mounted. Far from being on the brink of collapse RAF Fighter Command, though vastly outnumbered, had shown an incredible resilience. The fighting had reached a dramatic climax on Sunday 15th September when, bloodied and bruised, the Luftwaffe had lost the upper hand on a day of intense combat that had culminated with a humiliating retreat. Almost every day that had passed since then had seen the Luftwaffe do everything in its power to pummel London and regain the initiative, but the daylight raids were becoming increasingly costly. On Friday 27th September, 80 days after the Battle of Britain had officially begun, the Luftwaffe came once more, this time concentrating on the fastest bombers they had - Ju88s and Bf110s. And they came in force, principally targeting London and Bristol. Anthony Saunders' superb painting depicts one of these raids, this time by bombers from KG77 as they head over the Medway Estuary, east of the City of London, in an attempt to attack the capital's warehouses and docks. Among the many units defending the capital that day was 92 Squadron from Biggin Hill and Anthony portrays the Spitfire of Pilot Officer Geoffrey Wellum in his dramatic piece. With a deft flick of the rudder Wellum banks his fighter away to port seconds after sharing in the destruction of a Ju88. It was just one of more than 50 German aircraft destroyed by the RAF during the day.
Decisive Blow by Anthony Saunders.
 On the evening of 5th June 1944, at a dozen airfields across southern England, more than 13,000 American paratroopers prepared themselves for a mission that would change the course of history.  The next morning these brave young men found themselves at the forefront of the bitter fighting to secure the right flank of the Normandy beach-head.  The odds against them were huge and, if they failed, the American amphibious landings on Utah and Omaha beaches would face disaster - the destiny of the US First Army rested squarely on the shoulders of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions.

Final Roster by Anthony Saunders.
 P-47 Thunderbolts of the 509th Fighter Squadron, 405th Fighter Group, pass low over paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division advancing through heavy snow during the Battle of the Bulge, January 1945. Major Robert 'Blackie' Blackburn, in his distinctive aircraft <i>Chow Hound</i>, leads his unit as they head out on a morning low-level bombing mission.  In the early hours of 16th December 1944, out of nowhere, hundreds of panzers and thousands of troops poured forward as Hitler launched the last great German offensive of the war and, for once, the Allies had been wrong-footed.  The thinly-held Ardennes was the last place they had been expecting a counter-attack, but now three German armies were heading west across an 80-mile front.  Caught off guard the Americans rushed in reinforcements, including the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions encamped near Reims, over a hundred miles away.  Exhausted by the fighting in Holland during Operation Market Garden, they had been sent to Reims to recuperate.  They never got the chance.  Thrown into the thick of the action the 82nd helped to blunt the Germans' advance to the north, whilst at Bastogne, a pivotal town further south, the 101st, surrounded, out-numbered and besieged, refused to surrender.  The line held and three days before Christmas the panzers ground to a halt, stalled by lack of fuel.  As the weather improved the Allies could now bring their airpower into play. Hitler's last gamble had failed.

Thunder in the Ardennes by Anthony Saunders.
Swamped by mud amidst a desolate, shattered landscape, men and horses of the Royal Field Artillery drag their 18 pounder field-gun towards a new position on 15 November 1917, during the final days of the Battle of Passchendaele.  Whilst the army continues its grim fight on the ground, overhead Sopwith Camels from 45 Squadron Royal Flying Corps tangle in an equally deadly duel with German Albatros fighters of Jasta 6.  Flying the lead Sopwith Camel is the RFC Ace, 2nd Lt Kenneth Montgomery who scored the last of his 12 victories in this dogfight when he shot down the German Ace Leutnant Hans Ritter von Adam, the Commanding Officer of Jasta 6 with an impressive 21 victories to his name.  To commemorate one of the most significant anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men.  The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later - Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos - and one of the most savage - Passchendaele.

The Big Push - Passchendaele 1917 by Anthony Saunders.

 The swaggering figure of the Reichsmarshal swept imperiously into the Air Ministry on Berlin's Wilhemstrasse, his jewel-encrusted baton and extravagant uniform as flamboyant as ever. This was Saturday, 30th January 1943, the tenth Anniversary of the Nazi Party coming to power, and Goering was about to deliver the main speech in tribute to the Party and its leader, the Fuhrer - Adolf Hitler.  The Royal Air Force had other plans for the anniversary.  In stark defiance of the imagined air security safeguarding Berlin, brave pilots of 105 and 139 Sqn's took to the air in de Havilland Mosquitoes, on course for Germany.  Their mission: RAF Bomber Command's first daylight raid on Berlin!  The raid was timed to perfection and three Mosquitoes of 105 Sqn raced headlong, low level towards their target - the Haus des Rundfunks, headquarters of the German State broadcasting company.  It was an hour before Goering could finally be broadcast.  He was boiling with rage and humiliation.  A few hours later, adding further insult, Mosquitoes from 139 Sqn swept over the city in a second attack moments before Goebbels addressed a Nazi mass rally in the Sportpalast.  Goering's promise that enemy aircraft would never fly over the Reich was broken, the echo of that shame would haunt him for the rest of the war.  This  dramatic painting pays tribute to this pivotal moment in the war, capturing the Mosquito B.Mk.IVs of 105 Sqn departing the target area, following their successful strike on the Haus des Rundfunk.

Strike on Berlin by Anthony Saunders.
 Brimming with overconfidence, few on board the Japanese carrier Sōryū noticed the SBD Dauntless bombers gathering overhead.  Within a matter of minutes a few courageous US Navy pilots would change the course of history.  Anthony Saunders' new action-packed painting recreates the scene from the Battle of Midway as the SBD Dauntless pilots pull out of their death-defying dives having delivered their 1000lb bombs perfectly on target with three direct hits on the Japanese carrier.  Already there is utter chaos aboard the Sōryū as exploding ammunition and igniting fuel erupt onto the flight deck from the hangars below.  Secondary explosions rip through the ship, fires rage beyond control and her hull shudders to contain the violent inferno.  The Sōryū is doomed.
Midway - Attack on the Soryu by Anthony Saunders.
 The words from Air Vice-Marshal the Hon. Ralph Cochrane., newly appointed as AOC of No.5 Group, to the young Wing Commander were simple enough.  <i>I can't tell you the target</i> he continued <i>but you've got to fly low-level, on the deck, and at night.  As far as aircrews are concerned, I want the best - you choose them.  And by the way... I want to see your aircraft flying on four days</i>.  Guy Gibson, the highly decorated Wing Commander concerned, had 173 operations behind him and was due to be rested when the unexpected call to see Cochrane had come.  <i> Would you like to do one more trip?</i> he'd been asked.  <i>What kind of trip?</i> he replied.  <i>An important one</i> was all Cochrane would say and now, two days later, he was being asked to form a squadron.  What the special target might be Gibson could only speculate but, whatever it was, he realised it would be dangerous.  Cochrane had given him four days.  Within an hour he'd selected the aircrew; he knew most of them personally and had flown with several before.  There was no doubt they were the very best in Bomber Command.  Exactly four days later Squadron X - soon to become 617 Squadron - was ready at RAF Scampton.  Many familiar faces were there to meet him : amongst the pilots he spotted Hoppy Hopgood, Dave Shannon from Australia, and Canadian Lewis Burpee from his own 106 Squadron. together with Dinghy Young whom he'd chosen as a flight commander.  The tall, lugubrious figure of New Zealander Les Munro was there along with two other pilots from 97 Squadron, David Maltby and the big, beefy, American pilot Joe McCarthy with his Bomb-Aimer George Johnny Johnson.  His B flight commander, Henry Maudsley was there, as was Australian Mick Martin, the expert in low-level flying.  Every one of the nineteen crews who would fly the mission was there and seven weeks of intensive low-level flying lay ahead before, on the afternoon of 16th May 1943, Gibson finally revealed the target - that night they were to attack the mighty dams of the Ruhr valley.

Pathway to the Ruhr by Anthony Saunders.
 Flying at low-level over the Astra Romana oil refinery, Lt James Merrick of the 98th Bomb Group powers his B-24 'Lil De-icer' through the pall of burning debris as time-delayed bombs, dropped in error by a previous Group, explode beneath them.  With any hope of surprise now lost, and taking heavy losses in the process, the crews of the 98th bravely hold their bombers on course.  Allied planners knew that just over a third of all Germany's oil came from a single source - the oil fields at Ploesti, far to the east of deepest Romania.  If the oilfields and refineries at Ploesti could be destroyed, then Hitler's armies would be dealt a savage blow from which they might never recover.
To Hell and Back - Operation Tidal Wave by Anthony Saunders.


 On the night of 23/24 August 1943, a lone Fw190 of the Luftwaffe's crack unit JG300 Wilde Sau, defiantly engages a force of RAF Lancasters in the heavily defended, flak-torn skies over Berlin.  With the heavy bombers illuminated by bursting flak and the fires of the burning city below, the Luftwaffe pilot engages his target, just one of over 700 RAF long-range bombers thrown into the assault that night.  It was the opening salvo to the Battle of Berlin, the long and bitter aerial offensive against Hitler's seat of power that would rage throughout the winter to follow.  From November 1943 till March 1944 RAF Bomber Command would make 16 massed attacks on Berlin.  When the battle was over, the capital of the Third Reich lay shattered and in ruin, but the crews of RAF Bomber Command had paid a heavy price - 492 aircraft failed to return.

Berlin Boar Fight by Anthony Saunders.

On the night of 23/24 August 1943, a lone Fw190 of the Luftwaffe's crack unit JG300 Wilde Sau, defiantly engages a force of RAF Lancasters in the heavily defended, flak-torn skies over Berlin. With the heavy bombers illuminated by bursting flak and the fires of the burning city below, the Luftwaffe pilot engages his target, just one of over 700 RAF long-range bombers thrown into the assault that night. It was the opening salvo to the Battle of Berlin, the long and bitter aerial offensive against Hitler's seat of power that would rage throughout the winter to follow. From November 1943 till March 1944 RAF Bomber Command would make 16 massed attacks on Berlin. When the battle was over, the capital of the Third Reich lay shattered and in ruin, but the crews of RAF Bomber Command had paid a heavy price - 492 aircraft failed to return.



 October 1941, U203 approaches her mooring on the western bank at the French port of Brest. Her fate would be sealed by depth charges from the destroyer HMS Pathfinder and aircraft from the escort carrier HMS Biter while attacking the convoy ONS 4 south of Greenland on April 25th 1943.

U-203 Under Cover of Darkness by Anthony Saunders. (E)
 Libya, North Africa, 15th May 1941. British Cruiser Mark II (A10) tanks of 2nd Royal Tank Regiment, 7th Armoured Brigade pause during General Wavell's offensive against the Italian held Halfaya Pass and Fort Capuzzo. Led by General 'Straffer' Gott the attack was initially a success, but counter attacks by German reinforcements halted the British offensive after one day, and pushed it back to the Egyptian border.

Operation Brevity by David Pentland. (P)
 A Typhoon of 181 Squadron flown by Flt Lt Roy Crane is shown attacking a German armoured column in th Falaise Gap in August 1944.  Typhoons played a major role in destroying a large number of German armour and disrupting German movements during the battle of Falaise Gap.

Typhoon Country by Nicolas Trudgian. (C)
 Bridging, Review and Marching Order - Officers, Review Order - Field-Officer and Sapper, Constructing Shelter Trench.

Volunteer Royal Engineers by Richard Simkin (P)

German forces encircled in the fortress town of Konigsberg by 3rd Ukranian front prepare to break through the besieging Soviet lines to re-establish a supply line to the Baltic. Here some Stug III assault guns move up to their assembly area next to the towns World War One memorial. From here the attack was launched on February 18th 1945 and successfully opened a supply corridor which remained in place until 8th April.

Counter Attack at Konigsberg by David Pentland. (C)
 Normandy, France, 1944. U.S. Armoured Infantry and M3 halftracks of the 36th Infantry Regiment, 3rd (Spearhead) Armoured Division, in the Normandy bocage.

Spearhead by David Pentland. (AP)
 South African fullback Thinus Delport hands off the attempted tackle by Ronan O'Gara of Ireland during the South African Tour on November 19th 2000 at Lansdowne Road when South Africa beat Ireland 28 points to 18.

Tribute to South African Springbok Thinus Delport by Robert Highton. (B)
 The terrible battles that raged between the Italian and Austro-Hungarian armies on the Piave river in Northern Italy in June 1918 had already claimed many thousands of lives on both sides, but as the Italians drove the Austro-Hungarians back, things were to take a defining turn for the worse, as torrential rain and melting snow caused the river to flood, sweeping away bridges, boats and men alike.  The Italians continued to bombard their retreating enemy and rake them with machine gun fire as they tried to cross.  Italian and Allied aircraft too joined in the ruthless destruction of the beaten Austro-Hungarian forces and soon only one pontoon bridge remained. On 20th June, an Italian SIA.7b attempted to bomb this final lifeline, but its efforts were thwarted by the red Albatros D.III (Oef) of Hauptmann Godwin von Brumowski who immediately downed the intruder to claim his 35th - and final - confirmed victory, despite his own aircraft being hit no less than 37 times. An estimated 60,000 Austro-Hungarian troops are believed to have perished during the retreat across the Piave, surely one of WW1's most tragic episodes.

The Last Victory by Ivan Berryman. (AP)



A selection of some of the WW2 U-Boat Commander signatures that appear on the naval artwork of Anthony Saunders












A selection of some of the pilot signatures that appear on the aviation artwork of Anthony Saunders

Gunther Rall

Tony Pickering

Mickey Mount
Hector MacLean

Byron Duckenfield

Clyde East

Grant McDonald



Prints of the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
Collection of prints featuring the aircraft of the Royal Air Force

Prints of US Air Force
United States Air Force
A collection of prints and paintings featuring American aircraft.

Battle of Britain
Collection of prints featuring the aircraft of the Royal Air Force
Prints of Royal Naval Battleships
Royal Navy Battleships
HMS Prince of Wales / HMS Hood / HMS Warspite / HMS Barham......
Prints of Royal Naval Ships
Royal Navy Ships
All Royal Navy ships, including destroyers and cruisers.
Prints of US Naval Battleships
US Navy Battleships
USS Colorado / USS Iowa / USS North Carolina.....
Prints of US Aircraft Carriers
US Navy Carriers
USS Enterprise / USS Yorktown / USS Intrepid.....
Prints of German Naval Ships
German Navy Ships
Bismarck / Lutzow / Scharnhorst...
Prints of German U-Boats
German U-Boats
U-552 and many more famous U-boats...

Japanese Navy Ships
A selection of Japanese Navy vessels

On this day in Royal Navy history....

27 October

Found 83 matching entries.






27thOctober1885HMS HeroLaunched
27thOctober1898HMS HyacinthLaunched
27thOctober1905HMS CyclopsLaunched at Laing & Son at Sunderland
27thOctober1907HMS DreadnoughtOut of Dry Dock
27thOctober1907HMS AfricaCapt. H.R. Robinson in Command
27thOctober1907HMS AfricaArrive at the Nore
27thOctober1907HMS BulwarkArrived Sheerness
27thOctober1907HMS BulwarkFlagship of Rear Admiral F. Finnis
27thOctober1907HMS BulwarkCapt B.M. Chambers in Command
27thOctober1907HMS CochraneArrived Sheerness
27thOctober1907HMS CochraneCapt D.R.S. DeChair in Command
27thOctober1907HMS EssexArrived at the Little Nore then Sailed to Portsmouth
27thOctober1907HMS EssexCapt. R.J. Prendegast in Command
27thOctober1907HMS LeviathanArrived at Shoeburyness
27thOctober1907HMS LeviathanFlagship of Rear-Admiral G.A. Callaghan
27thOctober1907HMS LeviathanCapt W.O. Boothby in Command
27thOctober1914HMS AudaciousSailed Greenock
27thOctober1914HMS AudaciousMined
27thOctober1914HMS AjaxSailed Greenock
27thOctober1914HMS CenturionSailed Greenock
27thOctober1917HMS BryonyLaunched
27thOctober1919HMS L1Arrived Bombay
27thOctober1919HMS L3Arrived Bombay
27thOctober1919HMS L4Arrived Bombay
27thOctober1919HMS L7Arrived Bombay
27thOctober1919HMS L9Arrived Bombay
27thOctober1933HMS DauntlessArrived Port Stanley
27thOctober1933HMS BasiliskSailed UK for Gibraltar and work up
27thOctober1933HMS BlancheSailed UK for Gibraltar and work up
27thOctober1933HMS BoadiceaSailed UK for Gibraltar and work up
27thOctober1933HMS BoreasSailed UK for Gibraltar and work up
27thOctober1933HMS BrazenSailed UK for Gibraltar and work up
27thOctober1933HMS BeagleSailed UK for Gibraltar and work up
27thOctober1934HMS ActiveArrived Rosyth
27thOctober1934HMS BeeArrived Nanking
27thOctober1934HMS EmeraldSailed Colombo
27thOctober1934HMS EmeraldArrived Colombo
27thOctober1934HMS EmeraldArrived Colombo
27thOctober1934HMS CapetownArrived Wei Hai Wei
27thOctober1934HMS HerewardArrived Rosyth
27thOctober1934HMS HotspurArrived Rosyth
27thOctober1934HMS L27Arrived Rosyth
27thOctober1934HMS BeaufortArrived Oban
27thOctober1934HMS LupinArrived Debai
27thOctober1934HMS HardyArrived Rosyth
27thOctober1934HMS CourageousArrived Rosyth
27thOctober1936HMS AjaxSailed Coquimbo for Valparaiso
27thOctober1936HMS AjaxSailed Coquimbo for Valparaiso
27thOctober1937HMS CyclopsSailed Arzen for Oran
27thOctober1937HMS GipsyArrived Arzen
27thOctober1939HMS LadybirdSailed Shanghai for Hong Kong
27thOctober1939HMS DefenderSailed Alexandria on a 15-inch gun shoot
27thOctober1939HMS DiomedeSailed Sullom Voe for Northern Patrol duties
27thOctober1939HMS CairoSailed Grimsby on escort duties and arrived back later the same day.
27thOctober1939HMS CalcuttaArrived Grimsby
27thOctober1939HMS CapetownSailed Malta on patrol
27thOctober1939HMS ColomboSailed Sullom Voe for Northern Patrol duties
27thOctober1939HMS CeresSailed Plymouth for duty with the Northern Patrol
27thOctober1939HMS CeresRepairs completed
27thOctober1939HMS CaradocArrived Bermuda
27thOctober1939HMS DianaSailed Alexandria on a 15-inch gun shoot
27thOctober1939HMS HunterArrived Dakar. Refuelled and sailed to Trinidad.
27thOctober1939HMS HunterArrived Dakar
27thOctober1939HMS GlasgowArrived Portsmouth
27thOctober1939HMS GalateaArrived Malta
27thOctober1939HMS ExeterLeft patrol on the South American east coast
27thOctober1939HMS CumberlandJoined Exeter and Achilles
27thOctober1941HMS CossackSunk
27thOctober1942HMS CockatriceLaunched
27thOctober1942HMS IcarusLt.Cdr. Eric Norman Walmsley, DSC, RN In Command
27thOctober1943HMS HargoodLaid down at Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard Inc. (Hingham, Massachusetts, U.S.A.)
27thOctober1943HMS HydraT/A/Lt.Cdr. Charles Thomas Jegon Wellard, RNR In Command
27thOctober1952HMS GloryOff Singapore en-route to Korea
27thOctober1954HMS CentaurSailed Trieste
27thOctober1955HMS Loch AlvieArrived Bahrein
27thOctober1958HMS BlackpoolEscorted HMS Undine and HMS Ulysses to Plymouth
27thOctober1959HMS CavalierArrived Tokyo
27thOctober1967HMS Loch FadaDecommissioned
27thOctober1971HMS EagleSailed Hong Kong
27thOctober1979HMS AmbuscadeArrived Grand Cayman
27thOctober2001HMS BrocklesbyArrived Devonport
27thOctober2005HMS CornwallPlymouth Sound
27thOctober2007HMS Iron DukePlymouth Sound

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